1001 Inventions is an award-winning international science and cultural heritage organisation that raises awareness of the creative golden age of Muslim civilisation that stretched from Spain to China.

From the 7th century onwards, men and women of different faiths and cultures built on knowledge from ancient civilisations making breakthroughs that have left their mark on our world. Arab, Persian, Indian, Turkish, North African, Spanish, Sicilian and other nationalities and cultures formed this large area of Muslim Civilisation that included men and woman scholars of Muslim, Jewish, Christian, Sabean, Hindu and other faiths.

Knowledge from Assyrian, Babylonian, Chinese, Egyptian, Greek, Indian, Persian and Roman civilisations was highly prized in the Muslim Civilisation. Scholars advanced science by building upon ancient wisdom, making breakthroughs that have had a huge but mostly unknown influence on our world.

This ‘golden age of discovery’ took place during the so-called ‘dark ages’ of Europe. Join '1001 Inventions' on a journey to the past to inspire a better future!

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1001 Inventions reveals 10 marvellous maps from Muslim Civilisation that include one of the earliest known maps of South Amercia and maps where the world appears upside down! A time when North was South and South was North, towards Mecca...
Stunning colours light up the Nasīr al-Mulk Mosque in Shiraz, Iran. In this International Year of Light, photographer Mohammad Reza Domiri Ganji captures what on the outside looks like a conventional mosque... 
Though we may think of Timbuktu as the pre-eminent site of pre-colonial West African scholarship, we must remember that there were other places spanning across the Western and Central Sudan that were renowned for their tradition of teaching.
Paper, originally, was brought from China into Muslim Civilisation. From an art, Muslim Civilisation developed it into a major industry. Paper mills flourished across the Muslim World. The impact of Muslim Civilisations manufacture of paper helped paved the way for the printing revolution.
Ibn Sina, or Avicenna, lived in Hamadan and Jurjan from 980 to 1037 CE, and acquired great fame in mediaeval European medicine. His encyclopaedic book Al Qanun Fi Al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine) was translated into Latin at the end of the 12th century CE, and became a reference source for medical studies in the universities of Europe for 500 years!
A fascinating article about ‪Venice‬ a few hundred years ago when it flourished as the hub of Europe’s trade with the lands to its east and south. It shows how Venice was a meeting point for commerce and ‪culture‬, especially with the Muslim World.
Amazing snapshots from Khiva (formally known as Khawarizm) in Uzbekistan. The birth place of the famous mathematician Al-Khawarizmi (780 – 850 CE). A prosperous centre of learning during the Golden Age of Muslim Civilisation. (Source BBC)
TIME TELLING MACHINES: Revealing 7 marvellous mechanical and water-powered clocks from early Muslim Civilisation. These sophisticated devices that defied the Middle Ages.
Human life was highly valued during the Golden Age of Muslim Civilisation. The core essence of healing at the time can be summarised by 11th- century Ibn Sina in his book Canon when he said: “Medicine is a science, from which one learns the states of the human body…
Visitors to the China Science Festival in Beijing sample “Ibn al-Haytham‬’s ‪‎EyeScura‬” - a pin hole camera obscura at the "1001 Inventions and the World of Ibn Al-Haytham" Zone.